Wasted Honor -

Carl R. ToersBijns is the author of the Wasted Honor Trilogy [Wasted Honor I,II and Gorilla Justice] and his newest book From the Womb to the Tomb, the Tony Lester Story, which is a reflection of his life and his experiences as a correctional officer and a correctional administrator retiring with the rank of deputy warden in the New Mexico and Arizona correctional systems.

Carl also wrote a book on his combat experience in the Kindle book titled - Combat Medic - Men with destiny - A red cross of Valor -

Carl is considered by many a rogue expert in the field of prison security systems since leaving the profession. Carl has been involved in the design of many pilot programs related to mental health treatment, security threat groups, suicide prevention, and maximum custody operational plans including double bunking max inmates and enhancing security for staff. He invites you to read his books so you can understand and grasp the cultural and political implications and influences of these prisons. He deals with the emotions, the stress and anxiety as well as the realities faced working inside a prison. He deals with the occupational risks while elaborating on the psychological impact of both prison worker and prisoner.

His most recent book, Gorilla Justice, is an un-edited raw fictional version of realistic prison experiences and events through the eyes of an anecdotal translation of the inmate’s plight and suffering while enduring the harsh and toxic prison environment including solitary confinement.

Carl has been interviewed by numerous news stations and newspapers in Phoenix regarding the escape from the Kingman prison and other high profile media cases related to wrongful deaths and suicides inside prisons. His insights have been solicited by the ACLU, Amnesty International, and various other legal firms representing solitary confinement cases in California and Arizona. He is currently working on the STG Step Down program at Pelican Bay and has offered his own experience insights with the Center of Constitutional Rights lawyers and interns to establish a core program at the SHU units. He has personally corresponded and written with SHU prisoners to assess the living conditions and how it impacts their long term placement inside these type of units that are similar to those in Arizona Florence Eyman special management unit where Carl was a unit deputy warden for almost two years before his promotion to Deputy Warden of Operations in Safford and Eyman.

He is a strong advocate for the mentally ill and is a board member of David's Hope Inc. a non-profit advocacy group in Phoenix and also serves as a senior advisor for Law Enforcement Officers Advocates Council in Chino, California As a subject matter expert and corrections consultant, Carl has provided interviews and spoken on national and international radio talk shows e.g. BBC CBC Lou Show & TV shows as well as the Associated Press.

I use sarcasm, satire, parodies and other means to make you think!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
































































































































Sunday, May 10, 2015

Up in Smoke

Up in Smoke

An apocalyptic vision

Watching the news, the common headline read, “A prison was up in flames today after inmates went on a rampage, apparently sparked when they were ordered to lock down after a racial war broke out on the recreation yard spreading to the housing units almost immediately.”

Today, the Nebraska state government is dealing with a riot as other states have been over the past few years as prisons are overcrowded, understaffed and cutting costs that hurt inmate idleness and programming.

Nobody wants to read or hear about a prison riot where the prison goes up in smoke because we all have someone dear to us who works there and who might be put in more danger than there already is working inside a prison. Hopefully, staff will be evacuated and treated for injuries immediately and the areas is locked down completely.

Under current and past practices, staff would be forced to retreat from part of the effected sites due to understaffing and the inability to control and contain the areas until emergency units or back up resources become available and take back the prison. There will be millions of dollars of damage and the fires, flooding, wrecking ball destruction will create a budget deficit Arizona can ill afford as it climbs back into the saddle of economic prosperity under the new governor.

Hopefully, prison staff will be rushed to medical sites and a joint command center will be created to control and contain the disturbance. The cost of such resources equals those of a natural disaster but this disaster was man-made and totally unavoidable if prison management was based on best practices rather than the ad hoc manner they administer the policies today.

The signs of a prison riot are very common and predictable. First there will be a small disturbance that diverts the attention from the area where the main disruption is planned. Inmates know staffing weaknesses as they assess manpower daily and gangs in control of designated territory will always try to manipulate a power grab from such shortcoming as they increase their pressure to control the drugs, weapons and contraband.

All these disadvantages are published daily in the shift manpower numbers, their inability to cover vital areas and mass movement and the need to pull staff for other duties not related to shift coverage or inmate programming. Today, Arizona is more vulnerable than ever to riots and large scale disturbances as they cultural dynamics are not at the height of tension, conflict and corruption.

The governor will be red eyed mad when he sees the huge plumes of smoke billow into the sky about either Lewis, Eyman, Florence or Tucson. The possibility of it spreading to the other complexes spread out in the state are high and likely Winslow will be an active participant as well.

Inquiries will reveal many red flag warnings ignored and or forgotten as executive staff focus on the appeasement of inmates rather than providing a safe and secure environment that entails sound security practices and searches for contraband, weapons, drugs and cellphones.

The list is long but the tasks are not being completed except for the random mass searches that are so predictable, the contraband is hidden and the finds are symbolic rather than legitimately seized due to proper procedures in place consistently.

The executive inquiry will have a toned down message shifting the blame to individuals rather than the systems not in place to prevent such a catastrophe from occurring. The burning inferno will also be downplayed as the agency brags how it controls and contained the riot but fails to mention the extent of injuries and damage done until challenged for the specifics by the governor or the press.

There are and have been many warning of such a riot in the making. The house of cards has long been susceptible to a collapse of system failures as experience levels dropped, retention and morale of staff is low and the vacancy rates are high. Spending more money on private prison does nothing to alleviate the need in releasing the pressure of public run prisons.

In fact, it serves as a catalyst of inequality where inmates fight other inmates due to the lack of programs in state prisons compared to the better funded private prison. A normal tactic would be to allow the riot to calm down as resources arrive and set up a more secure perimeter as the inmates destroy buildings and its contents and corrections and other agencies become spectators until such time a plan is initiated to take back the prison.

Make no mistake and let me make myself very clear, under the present conditions of high gang violence and extortion, with high assaults on inmates and staff out of control and the need for protective custody on the rise, the prisoners will mutiny. They will revolt and push back hard when the right time comes for them to act out and take over the prison sending it up in smoke.

There thread has been unraveling. Staff have seen the difference in tone and demeanor but nothing has been done to tone it down. This was a long time waiting but the end is near. A riot is just around the corner and when or where is yet unknown. Sadly, the DOC is ill prepared as many others around the country take it for granted it won’t happen here.